Tag Archives: engage

Breakthroughs In Molecular Imaging

by on March 5, 2015

The de la Zerda Group at the Stanford University School of Medicine is making strides in being able to idenify and characterize tumors in clinical settings. Adam de la Zerda
visited the PJCC to describe the revolutionary molecular imaging technique his team pioneered.

Adam was chosen as one of Forbes 30 Under 30 in Science in 2012 and 2014.

Optimism & Your Health

by on February 5, 2015

Optimism-women

During medical training at UCLA, I had the good fortune to learn from Norman Cousins, a Jewish writer, editor, and adjunct professor of medical humanities. Despite being misdiagnosed with tuberculosis at age 11, he set out as a boy to “discover exuberance.” He believed that positive emotions were the key to fighting illness, which he exemplified in the telling of his own battle with a severe form of arthritis. In the book Anatomy of An Illness, he describes his victory over a potentially life-threatening condition by taking mega doses of vitamin C, and watching Marx Brothers movies and TV sitcoms. He relates, “Laughter is a form of internal jogging. It moves your internal organs around. It enhances respiration. It is an ignitor of great expectations.” His underlying belief was that positive emotions induce favorable biochemical changes in the body so that healing is more likely to occur.

Proverbs 17:22 states, “A joyful heart makes for good health; despondency dries up the bones.” So clearly, a correlation of cheerfulness with health has been recognized for centuries, but what is the supporting evidence? Do optimistic people simply take care of themselves better than pessimistic people, does being in good health by itself lead to optimism, or are both choices correct? The results of The Women’s Health Initiative study of 100,000 postmenopausal women showed that cynicism and hostility were associated with a higher risk of heart disease and cancer, and optimism led to longer life. In a large meta-review of 83 studies published in the 2009 Annals of Behavioral Medicine, optimism was found to be a significant predictor of positive health outcomes ranging from heart disease and stroke, pregnancy, cancer, and stronger immunity – even against the common cold. Benefits also included lower rate of depression and better coping in times of stress. My conclusion from reviewing these medical studies is that optimism leads to healthy behavior and outcomes, but also practicing healthy habits, in turn, leads to greater optimism.

One has to be careful about overgeneralizing the impact of optimism on health. If a person gets sick with heart disease or cancer, does that mean the illness was that person’s fault? Don’t assume that the root of all illness is negative thinking, and that thinking positively will provide the cure. Our emotions are only one determinant of our overall health, and whatever side of the optimism/pessimism spectrum you are on, it’s important to make appropriate health-wise decisions. For example, I have known patients who were pessimistic about having a heart attack because a parent died at an early age. This fearful attitude resulted in a strong devotion to avoiding cholesterol and to exercising rigorously. Some optimists think they will never get sick, so they shun vaccinations or screening tests for cancer. Others have had the unfortunate circumstance to have suffered trauma or loss of a loved one or suffering from clinical depression, so telling them to simply be optimistic is inappropriate. So whatever your outlook on life, it’s important to understand your own situation.

Most of us are born with a predisposition to seeing the glass half full or half empty, but my observations from treating hundreds of patients as well as observing behavior of friends and family have led me to believe that our outlook on life can be changed significantly. Here are some recommendations worth practicing to enhance one’s mood and outlook:

  1.  Express gratitude.
  2. Show compassion.
  3.  Exercise regularly to increase the pleasure hormones in your brain. Do something you enjoy such as walking, running, biking, or rowing a kayak. If your spouse orders you, “Go take a hike,” you both will be in better moods when you reunite!
  4.  Be forgiving of yourself, and laugh at yourself if you had an embarrassing moment.
  5.  Be playful. If you have young grandchildren, this is easier.
  6. Like Norman Cousins, entertain yourself with a humorous movie or sitcom.
  7.  Indulge yourself in a good novel, and share your insights in a book group or with friends.
  8. Play a musical instrument or sing, or attend a fine concert.
  9.  Enjoy a friendly game of bridge, scrabble, or poker with friends. Just don’t lose!
  10. Go to a play, especially a comedy.
  11. Volunteer. If you don’t already volunteer somewhere, you will be amazed what this does for your mood.
  12.  Eat a healthy diet and don’t drink in excess. (When alcohol wears off, it can act as a depressant.)
  13.  Surround yourself with supportive positive people.
  14. Pray. The mind-body connection is promoted by praying, helping to relieve stress and worry and indirectly improving your emotional and physical condition.

Conclusion
Whether you like it or not, our emotions affect our physical health. You do have some control over your life, and it’s never too late to practice behaviors that will help you see the glass at least half full. Oprah Winfrey, in her recent memoir What I Know for Sure, states, I continued to believe that no matter how hard the climb, there is always a way to let in a sliver of light to illuminate the path forward.

For more information about happiness and health, go to the Harvard School of Public Health.

Jerry Saliman, MD is a volunteer internist at Samaritan House Medical Clinic in San Mateo. He retired from Kaiser South San Francisco after working there more than 30 years. While at Kaiser SSF, Dr. Saliman was also Chief of Patient Education. He received the 2012 “Lifetime Achievement Award” given by the Kaiser SSF Medical Staff.

Editing acknowledgement: Ellen Saliman

Neither the PJCC or our guest columnists provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please make your health care decisions in partnership with your health care provider

Half My Size: A Weight Loss Journey

by on January 28, 2015

Randi-transformed-blog-625

By Randi  Reed, PJCC Assistant Camp Director

Everyone asks me what happened. How did I do it?

As a teenager at age 16 I weighed 350 lbs. If that sounds like it would be hard to overcome, it was.

I had PCOS (Polycystic ovary syndrome) and I knew if I kept going and growing the way I was, I would have died. With help from my doctor to get the PCOS and hormones under control I Continue reading

Out Of The Desert Innovation Blooms

by on January 21, 2015

techno-pill-625

A desert state in a modern era, Israel has sparked the way as a world leader in resource allocation with pioneering innovations in solar energy and irrigation development. In fact, contemporary Israel is a major player on the world stage of technology, medicine, and engineering, boasting more scientists, technicians, and engineers per capita (140 per 10,000) than any other country in the world.

For a country so young, and so fraught with turmoil, an astonishing amount of life-enhancing Continue reading

Norovirus – The Winter Bug

by on January 16, 2015

Sick-girl-625

Thanksgiving weekend 2014 was a time to forget for our family. My wife and I planned for the arrival of our children, their spouses, and four grandchildren for months. One of my granddaughters would Facetime daily to see what toys she would play with when she would eventually visit. The night before Thanksgiving, one son-in-law became acutely ill with a GI bug, and he wasn’t able to go to Thanksgiving dinner. The day after Thanksgiving, two of my daughters became acutely ill. By Thanksgiving weekend, the illness had ravaged through our entire family except for my wife and one granddaughter who was protected through the magic Continue reading

Israel: Complex, Compelling, Clarified

by on January 13, 2015

hartman-625

Rabbi Dr. Donniel Hartman tackles complex challenges facing the country

Whatever our personal views about Israel, it is likely we all agree that Israel is among the most complex and complicated nations in the world. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict appears intractable, with both sides refusing even to acknowledge a common narrative of the genesis of the conflict. This has raised significant moral questions (often by Israeli writers and thinkers) about the appropriateness of Israel’s military response.

There are also conflicts within Israeli society. The relationship between Ashkenazi (Jews of Central and Eastern European descent) and Shephardi (Jews of Spanish and Middle Eastern Continue reading

Wellness Coaching. What’s In It For Me?

by on January 6, 2015

wellness-coach-success-625

As a wellness coach, I am asked this question on a regular basis. I like to respond by relating the coaching I do to that of any other coach: A coach is someone who can help you make specific improvements to your technique which will add value to your overall game.  A good coach does this by shining a new perspective on an activity or simply holding their pupil accountable to their goals. You use a running coach to improve your running skills and timing. And if you want Continue reading

Olive Tapenade: Easy to Make & Delicious

by on December 17, 2014

OLIVE TAPENADE RECIPE

Ingredients

1/2 pound pitted mixed olives
1 small clove garlic, minced
2 Tbl. capers
2-3 fresh basil leaves
1 Tbl. freshly squeezed lemon juice
2 Tbl. extra-virgin olive oil

Directions

  • Thoroughly rinse the olives in cool water.
  • Place all ingredients in the bowl of a food processor.
  • Process to combine, stopping to scrape down the sides of the bowl, until mixture becomes a coarse paste, approximately 1-2 minutes total.
  • Transfer to a bowl and serve!

Bon Appetit

 

For more on Olive Oil, listen to our Podcast with the California Olive Oil Council.

Podcast: A World of Olive Oil – Presented by the California Olive Oil Council

by on December 9, 2014

Olive-Oil-audio-image-625

Click image above to listen to Podcast (50 min)

Kimberly Gordon, PJCC Cultural Arts Director, introduces  Lisa Pollack, Marketing Coordinator, California Olive Oil Council and Sandy Sonnenfelt who is a trained olive oil taster and is a member of California Olive Oil Council and UC Davis taste panels. For many years she was a judge at the LA International Olive Oil Competition and she also judges in many of the local olive oil competitions. She is a frequent presenter at olive oil educational seminars. Since Continue reading

Depression — The Lowdown

by on December 2, 2014

Depression-man-625

News of Robin Williams’ suicide was a shock. How could a man devoted to making others laugh take his own life? His death brought the disorder of clinical depression to the forefront.

Depression is a common mental illness that is manifested by prolonged sense of sadness, and other symptoms such as loss of desire to do pleasurable activities, irritability, insomnia or oversleeping, change in appetite, loss of energy, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, and sometimes thoughts of death or suicide. Depression affects 1 in 11 adults, and nearly twice as many women as men. Sadness and depression are different. Many people feel sad after losing a loved one, or losing a job, or ending a relationship. People who are depressed, however, can usually differentiate normal grief from the disabling continued weight of clinical depression. Although there is excellent treatment for depression, many people do not seek help because they mistakenly construe it as a personal weakness rather than a legitimate illness. Many celebrities have publically acknowledged their own battles with depression in hopes that others Continue reading