Monthly Archives: September 2015

My First Day

by on September 30, 2015

paul geduldig pjcc ceo

September 29, 2015

Today marks my first day serving as the new Chief Executive Officer of the PJCC and it was a day filled with inspiring moments and experiences. As I walked through our beautiful Center I was thrilled by the vibrancy and diversity of the programs offered and of the people participating. In a single day, I encountered Preschool children buzzing about classrooms, adults attending fitness classes, kids learning to swim, youth engaged in dynamic afterschool programs, a lively Continue reading

Member Profile: Gene Hetzer

by on September 29, 2015

gene hetzer pjcc

It’s a common refrain that people will often embrace any excuse to avoid exercise, ranging from a “painful paper cut” to a “can’t miss” episode of television’s Shark Tank. However, Gene Hetzer, Jr., doesn’t let anything stop him from his workouts at the PJCC, including the fact that he’s vision impaired.

The 63-year-old is on the treadmill at least twice a week with his guide dog, a Golden Retriever named Lynmar, waiting patiently at his side. Blind since birth, Gene lost his vision due to oxygen Continue reading

eScapegoat: Offload Your Sins Online

by on September 22, 2015

yom kippur

Ever Wanted to Take Your Sins & Throw Them Off A Cliff? 

With Yom Kippur comes a time of atonement. It involves asking forgiveness from people you’ve wronged and repenting for the sins that you may have committed during the year.

In preparation for Yom Kippur you can use G-dcast’s eScapegoat app as a way to cast off your sins. Come on over to PJCCs dedicated eScapegoat page, let the program guide you on a brief walk through the desert, then offload your sins to a virtual goat. Everyone’s anonymous “I’m sorry’s” will show up on page.

Learn more about Yom Kippur at www.pjcc.org and through our blog post Let It Go: The Benefit of Forgiveness.

At-One-Ment: Returning To Ourselves

by on September 21, 2015

Yom Kippur (Hebrew for the “Day of Atonement”) is said to be the most solemn and introspective day of the Jewish calendar. It is the culmination of a ten-day period of reflection, beginning with Rosh Hashanah. During these ten days we are invited to engage in a fearless moral inventory to assess the state of our souls and to reset our moral compasses.

These ten days are traditionally the time to approach people we have hurt, if we have not done Continue reading

Visual Midrash: Artistic Commentary on the Torah

by on September 20, 2015

torah midrash art exhibit

Mid • rash | mid räSH |
noun (pl. Midrashim) an ancient commentary on part of the Hebrew scriptures, attached to the biblical text.

We’re unscrolling the Torah, all 54 portions; not literally, but figuratively. Artist Scott Switzer has painted each one in The Torah Series, oil paintings based on portions of the Hebrew Bible that are read each week in synagogues. The paintings capture one complete year of readings on 24” x 24” canvases that are embedded in six grids, each made up of nine panes. The exhibition is  currently on display in the PJCC Art Gallery.

The approach of finding deep and spiritual understanding of the Torah through artistic expression is referred to as visual midrash (Rabbinic commentaries on the Torah’s
teachings). Switzer, who is not Jewish, found that engaging in these stories through Judaism’s perspective, “gave them new life and changed my consciousness.” He considers the paintings in this series “ … a conversation or even a prayer.” His figurative style and color palate are reminiscent of Marc Chagall’s well-known Biblical artwork.

Visual midrash is not new to the PJCC. In 2009 our gallery hosted Seeing Sinai, a collaboration between modern artist Jill Nathanson and Judaic scholar Arnold Eisen. And certainly our vibrant Grow Justice Mural utilized this process in a community-based setting. This summer, you can partake in a workshop to create your own visual commentary. Rabbi Lavey Derby and Scott
Switzer will partner to lead a text study/studio session where each participant will have the opportunity to express their own personal artistic interpretation of the week’s Torah portion.

Our endeavor follows the footsteps of Reboot’s Unscrolled, a book featuring the works of 54 different writers and artists who were invited to select a portion of the Torah and provide their fresh interpretation. As described by Reboot, it’s now our turn to “approach the Torah with a spirit of creative adventure, wrestle with it,” and then find our own meaning. Throughout the PJCC’s 2015-2016 season, you’ll enjoy the opportunity to engage in Jewish learning and examine
multiple forms of creative midrash through poetry, musical composition, movement,  and storytelling.

The close of The Torah Series coincides with Simchat Torah on October 6, the celebratory Jewish holiday that marks the annual completion of the year’s Torah reading.  As congregants in  synagogues around the world re-roll the Torah to start anew,  we too will “roll” up Switzer’s  enchanting enterprise to share with another  community in the New Year.

PJCC Art Gallery presents
The Torah Series
On display in the PJCC Art Gallery
through October 6, 2015

 Prints are for sale through the artist. Great to commemorate bar/bat mitzvahs, life events, or other special occasions. www. scottswitzer.com.
TO ORDER:
Telephone: 208.935.5978
Email: switz_thepainter@msn.com
Specify image # (1-54); and cite PJCC for commission credit.
Allow 2 – 3 weeks for delivery

 

 

 

CPR: Are You Prepared to Help?

by on September 17, 2015

cpr

May 16, 2003, 7:50 AM. 
My wife and I enter the quad at a Midwestern university.  There are orderly rows of white chairs on the lawn, and on each one is a bottle of water labeled with the university logo, and a program for the commencement ceremony.  Scores of people are hurrying to the seats, streaming in from all sides of the quad with the graduates penned off to the side.  I am looking forward to witnessing the first of my three daughters graduate from college, and to hearing the commencement speaker, Madeleine Albright.  Suddenly my wife notices people gathered around a woman on the ground.  My wife encourages me to see if I can be of assistance. I identify myself as an internist to the woman and she responds with halting, labored breathing that she is having chest pain.  I grab her wrist and realize her skin is cold and clammy, and find her pulse weak and fairly rapid.  It was immediately apparent that she is having a heart attack, and her condition is critical.  I ask the bystanders and the security guard if paramedics had been summoned, and they assure me this was the case. Another physician is at the scene too, a pediatric endocrinologist, and she informs me that she too had requested paramedics.

7:55 AM. 
The woman’s pulse becomes weaker, her breathing shallow, and she loses consciousness. Her acute heart attack has led to cardiac arrest.  I start CPR.

According to a recent New England of Journal Medicine study of June, 2015, there are 420,000 cases of out of hospital cardiac arrests each year in the U.S, which corresponds to 38 people experiencing one every hour. Odds are that you know a friend or family member who has had one.  Survival chances decrease about 10% for every minute following a cardiac arrest, but less than half of persons with a cardiac arrest receive bystander CPR. When CPR is performed before paramedic arrival the thirty day survival improves from 4% to 10.5%.

Many people assume that cardiac arrests take place outside the home where there will be a willing bystander to initiate CPR.  Surprisingly, 88% of cardiac arrests occur in the home, so if you are called upon to initiate CPR at home, the life you save could be a spouse, parent, child or friend.  Since 2008, the American Heart Association has offered hands-only CPR for adult cardiac arrest as an alternative to chest compressions plus breaths because the outcomes are similar.  Although, a CPR course is advised, the instructions are simple: call 9-1-1, and push hard and fast in the center of the chest to the tune of “Stayin Alive.”  Here is the link: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/CPRAndECC/HandsOnlyCPR/Hands-Only-CPR_UCM_440559_SubHomePage.jsp

The San Francisco Unified School District has a reason to be proud. Starting this school year, SF is the largest school district in the country to add hands-only CPR to its ninth grade health curriculum.  Improvement in rates of bystander initiated CPR is a critical public health issue and it is encouraging to see this initiative.

8:00 AM. 
Paramedics have not arrived yet.  I continue chest compressions, and the pediatric endocrinologist administers mouth to mouth breaths.  Oxygen and an AED, or automated external defibrillator, are unavailable.

8:15 AM.
Paramedics finally arrive!  They had trouble navigating through narrow crowded roads into a congested space.  Initial evaluation by them reveals the woman has a heart rate but absent blood pressure.

When I returned home, I wrote the chancellor of the university expressing my dismay over the lack of emergency medical support for this large gathering of people.   Four years later, when we returned for my youngest daughter’s graduation from the same university, it was gratifying to see a paramedic vehicle right on site.

Sadly, as I learned later, the woman who we tried to resuscitate died at a nearby hospital.  She was the grandmother of a graduating classmate of my daughter.  If resuscitation had been successful, the grandmother could have been expected to continue to live a normal life. Although bystander CPR improves the odds of survival by more than 2.5 times, probably too much time elapsed before advanced paramedic resuscitation was begun.  One never knows when you may need to perform CPR so I “heartily” encourage you to take a CPR course near you: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/CPRAndECC/FindaCourse/Find-a-Course_UCM_303220_SubHomePage.jsp

Jerry Saliman, MD is a volunteer internist at Samaritan House Medical Clinic in San Mateo.  He retired from Kaiser South San Francisco after working there more than 30 years.  While at Kaiser SSF, Dr. Saliman was also Chief of Patient Education.  He received the 2012 “Lifetime Achievement Award” given by the Kaiser SSF Medical Staff. 

Editing acknowledgement: Ellen Saliman

Neither the PJCC or our guest columnists provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please make your health care decisions in partnership with your health care provider.

 

 

VIDEO: Rabbis’ Roundtable | What Is The Meaning Of Repentance?

by on September 16, 2015

Listen to four Peninsula Rabbis talk about the meaning of repentance. That was the topic of our annual Rabbis’ Roundtable on September 2, 2015. Participating Peninsula rabbis included Rabbi Nat Ezray of Congregation Beth Jacob, Rabbi Corey Helfand of Peninsula Sinai Congregation, Rabbi Dennis Eisner of Peninsula Temple Beth El, Rabbi Daniel Feder of Peninsula Temple Sholom, and, moderating, was Rabbi Lavey Derby of the Peninsula Jewish Community Center.

Flourless Honey-Almond Cake

by on September 10, 2015

Flourless Honey-Almond Cake is the perfect dessert for Rosh Hashanah or any time of the year!

CAKE

  • 1-1/2 cups almond meal – I get mine at Trader Joes
  • 4 large eggs, separated
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

TOPPING

  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1/4 cup sliced almonds

DIRECTIONS

  • Preheat oven to 350°F.
  • Coat a 9-inch springform pan with cooking spray.
  • Line the bottom with parchment paper and spray the paper.
  • Beat 4 egg yolks, 1/2 cup honey, vanilla, baking soda and salt in a large mixing bowl until combined. Add the almond meal and mix.
  • Beat 4 egg whites in another large bowl with an hand mixer or whisk until white and bubbly but not stiff enough to hold peaks, about. 1 to 2 minutes. Gently fold the egg whites into the nut mixture until just combined. Scrape the batter into the prepared pan.
  • Bake the cake until golden brown and a skewer inserted into the center comes out clean, about 25 minutes. Let cool in the pan for 10 minutes.
  • Run a knife around the edge of the pan and gently remove the side ring. Let cool completely.
  • Drizzle the top of the cake with honey and sprinkle with sliced almonds.

 

 

Let It Go! The Benefit of Forgiveness

by on September 8, 2015

shofar rosh hashanah yom kippur

Central to the understanding of the Jewish High Holidays of Rosh Hashanah (the New Year) and Yom Kippur (the Day of Atonement) is the simple yet fundamental belief that people can change. We need not be stuck in habitual conditioned behaviors. We need not repeat the same behaviors that are hurtful to ourselves or to others over and over again. We are capable of change and growth. The great mystic and sage Rabbi Levi Yitzchak of Berditchev taught that it is incumbent upon each individual to believe that with the next breath we can become new beings. The possibility of personal renewal is the great mystery of being human.

The blowing of the shofar – the ram’s horn – is the climax of the High Holiday ritual. The sound of the shofar is meant to cut through our web of routine, rationalization and conditioning, to wake us up to our true nature, which is goodness, love and compassion, and to urge us to leave behind behaviors and actions that cause suffering to ourselves or to others.

Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur offer us the personal and communal spiritual task of teshuvah – repentance. Repentance is the self-aware practice of assessing our deeds and our spiritual condition. To participate in the practice of repentance requires a willingness to engage in a courageous moral inventory, to ask for and give forgiveness and to make amends where possible. Repentance is achieved when we recognize and regret our hurtful behavior; we discontinue the behavior and determine not to repeat that behavior in the future. Repentance also requires asking forgiveness from those we have hurt. While we ask others for forgiveness, it is also important that we find a way to forgive ourselves. We are, after all, merely human.

While asking for forgiveness can be hard, offering forgiveness to others can be much more difficult. Sometimes we feel so hurt by others that the possibility of our forgiveness seems impossible. We simply can’t let go of the hurt and the anger. We hold on to our hurt as if it were a prize, a badge of honor. We have no desire to be in relationship with the person who has hurt us. Or, we feel that to forgive that person would be to condone what they did to us.

What we fail to understand is that as we hold on to our hurts and wounds for dear life, all we accomplish is to prolong the hurt. It has been said that holding on to our anger at the person who hurt us, is akin to holding on to a burning coal: the only person who gets burned is us.

Forgiveness does not require us to trust the person who hurt us or to re-establish a close relationship with her, nor does it mean we condone what was done to us. It simply means that we put down our anger and let go of it. As my teacher and friend Sylvia Boorstein likes to say, “Forgiveness is giving up all hope of a better yesterday.” We cannot change what happened, but we can change our attitude about what happened. We don’t need to bear the painful burden of it forever.

Receiving forgiveness from others is a relief; asking forgiveness of others is an act of grace. Either way, forgiveness is a miraculous experience. Without the possibility of forgiveness we would live with constant despair. The promise of the High Holidays is that we can live instead with profound hope.

May this New Year bring us all health, happiness and abundant hope.